Say Hello to Solo Sexx

Bio:

Forged deep in the psychedelic undertow of UMass basements, sticky floored queer clubs, house parties, porches, and backyards, Solo Sexx has been serving rude and riotous Salt-n-Pepa-meets-Buzzcocks-meets-Shangri Las realness since 2008. Since then, they’ve glittered and grinded all up over New England and beyond, performing at the Boston Freedom Rally, touring the East Coast, rocking festivals and events for the likes of Girls Rock Camp Boston, the Human Rights Campaign, Yes All Women, and more–all while bringing their unique brand of fearless flavor to audiences who leave wondering how they ever survived sans-Sexx. With a fearless sense of humor and a no-holds barred attitude, Solo Sexx turns the hip-hop hypocrites on their head and leads fans to a whole new horizon: with home cooked beats and outta sight rhymes covering everything from being broke (not for long), being white (last they checked), and being free to perform the self pleasure their name is shouting, Solo Sexx proves that the alternative to the add-water-and-stir rap chumpitude is funkier, fresher, and just plain sexxier than ever before.

QWIMB Q & A

What brought you to Boston?

Heather Mack: I grew up in the ‘burbs, moved out to Wild Western Mass to get weird for 5 years, then when I graduated from UMass decided it was time to take my chance on the “big” “city” of Boston. I’ve been here ever since!
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Have you experienced a strong scene for queer women in the city in terms of music/performers etc?

Heather Mack: I think Boston is incredibly lucky to have a fierce faction of queer feminist badasses involved in all aspects of artmaking, from promotions to production to burlesque to punk rock and everything in between. The best part is, although the queer scene is relatively small, people are LOUD about it–in one week you might have Queeraoke, WTFQueerlesque, and Pink Noize, all unapologetically loud and raucous queer, feminist events happening at all different parts of town. And for the most part it’s pretty inclusive, like a big weird rainbow family you just might not have met yet. We freaks tend to stick together, and it makes a big difference.

Do you have any sense of a history of a queer scene in the city?

Heather Mack: The first “queer” event I ever attended in the city was probably Rocky Horror back when it was in Harvard Square–I was just a little tyke back then! Since then I’ve felt incredibly blessed by all of the opportunities I’ve had to be involved in the queer scene, as a performer and as a fan. I’m not so sure about the scene’s “history”, since I didn’t really start identifying as queer until college out in W.Mass where I frequented queer events for the first time, and only since coming to Boston about 5 years ago have I gotten really involved in this scene in particular. Either way, I’m pumped to be out here making new queer history with so many awesome artists and visionaries, and I gotta say, the future’s looking bright!
Julezcloseup

What made you decide to join a band?

Julez:Being around creative people during those crucial college years who were also experimenting with music and constantly producing art of all genres. For me, the beats came first and I owe a lot of my early inspiration and motivation to that core group of creative friends.

Heather Mack: Julez really says it best, we were just incredibly lucky during our college years to have been part of a chaotic cotillion of psychedelic musicians, artists, visionaries and weirdos that had our own unique culture and community where everyone was not only free, but encouraged to experiment with everything, especially art. I had started a punk band when I was in high school called The Bush Administration and even though we didn’t take ourselves seriously I was really addicted to the feeling of shocking people onstage with something they didn’t expect, or would otherwise dismiss. I also already had an instinct for having a fully female fronted band performing songs that were filled with innuendo, and that riotous, raunchy energy provided the foundation for my later music.  In college I was part of a crew of dudes who were into hip hop and freestyling, then Julez transferred to UMass and everything got kicked into overdrive. She went home for winter break and taught herself to make beats, by the time she got back we were writing songs for just the two of us. That’s when we created “Solo Sexx”–the name is a reference to going solo, pleasing yourself first, and knowing that sometimes you just gotta do it on your own, you know?

Are there any artists that you look up to or who have inspired your own music?

Julez: DJ culture has always been a big influence on me. I was always trying to recreate the way DJs mix different sounds and samples together. So our beats reflects that.

Heather Mack: AAAH! So many. Rupaul, Kate Bush, GG Allin, TT The Artist, Rye Rye, Santigold, MIA, Buzzcocks, 90s house divas, Cakes Da Killa, PWR BTTM, David Bowie, Amanda Palmer, Missy Elliott, Downtown Boys, Mykki Blanco, Big Freedia, the Shangri-Las–bands who challenge the status quo, defy gender roles, and just make badass music that challenges you to think critically while also having an absolute blast on the dance floor.

Do think things are getting better for queer female performers or are there still barriers to overcome?

Heather Mack: The internet is bringing things to a whole new level in a really positive way–I think queer female performers are getting much more visibility, and more and more celebrities are coming out as genderqueer and trans and sexually fluid, so that’s helpful in terms of breaking down old narratives and stereotypes around gender and sexuality. I also think there’s been a push to create intentional queer DIY spaces where those artists are not only welcome, but explicitly sought out and celebrated. The more visibility there is, the more we are able to give permission to other queer female or trans or genderfluid artists to be fully, wildly themselves–and to support one another in the process. I’m also pumped that venues tend to be really open to having queer events or having queer identified bands perform, and I’m happy to be able to host events like that too–like our upcoming Queer Women in Hip Hop night.

closeupHeatherYAW

Are you in any other bands?

Heather Mack: Nope! But I am in the Boston League of Women Wrestlers.

What has been your proudest moment as a member of a band?

Julez: Performing on stage at the weed rally in Boston a few years back! Such a huge crowd- felt like a rockstar.

Heather Mack: My favorite part of being in a band is the reactions we get from the crowd. Although every single show we invariably have some crew of (usually) dudes come up and say some version of “I thought you were gonna suck, but you were amazing!” and it’s always satisfying to know that you smashed a stranger’s perception of you, that’s not what makes me proud. What’s really incredible is when young women come up to us and tell us that we showed them that it’s possible to be a woman who raps and rocks crowds, and that we inspired them to try to make music too. As much as we do it for ourselves (hence the name, again), those moments are what sustains us and make us really proud of what we’re doing. That’s why we also love to do events for badass organizations like Yes All Women, Human Rights Campaign, and Girls Rock Camp Boston–because we know we’re offering up our art to help contribute to a positive, supportive community where people of all genders and sexualities have the resources they need to rock out in whatever way they choose.

What advice would you give to a woman thinking about starting a band or learning an instrument?

Julez:YOU HAVE NOTHING TO LOSE! Seriously don’t be afraid to take that first step, and don’t doubt yourself too much. And if you’re lucky and the ideas and creativity starts flowing early on DON’T SLEEP ON IT! Make the most of it- it’s a precious commodity.

Heather Mack: DO IT! Make mistakes. Write a song, then scribble it out and start over 20 times. Then stop scribbling things out and embrace every flaw as a foundation for something fabulous. Go see local shows and discover new heroes. Make friends with your heroes. Book shows with your heroes! Don’t wait for other people to do things for you–learn everything you can by throwing yourself into it. If you feel like there aren’t enough cool venues in Boston, create one. If bookers don’t want to book a hip hop show, bypass them and book shows yourself. Make other amazing friends who create weirdo art and love you for it and hold you accountable to your aspirations. Be reckless, fearless, and bold–even if you’re terrified. There’s no time like the present–and life’s too damn short to be boring!

Are there any other current or former bands you would like to see featured by QWIMB?

Heather Mack: Check out Afro Panther (iamafropanther.soundcloud.com) and Billy Dean Thomas (facebook.com/billydeanslist), two artists who will be performing along with us at our upcoming Queer Women in Hip Hop showcase at the Lilypad, January 30th!

For more from Solo Sexx:

Q & A with Reba of the Kitschenettes

reba
Reba

The Kitschenettes are a 4 piece, “quiet grrrl” band based in Somerville and Jamaica Plain. All four band members are long-time volunteers for Girls Rock Camp Boston and all have been active in the Boston music scene for many years. Band member, Reba Mitchell, was kind enough to answer some questions about Boston and queerness for us.

scene? Has it changed over time?

RebaI’m not really sure how to identify the queer music scene. I mean, I know a lot of local musicians who identify as queer, but I’m hesitant to slap that label on their bands because of it. I’m also not super in touch with local music. I am, however, in touch with cable tv, snacks, and going to bed early on weekends. Is there a Queer Women in Pajamas blog?

What brought you to Boston? Are you local?

RebaI came to Boston because New Hampshire is terrible. Kathleen went to school in Boston, and she is from New York. Ashley is from the area. Slamber has lived in California and Texas, but has been in Boston for some time.

Artists inspired you personally or musically?

RebaWhen I was 15 or so, I was fortunate to have been introduced to a lot of riot grrl/queercore bands. The Internet had a lot to do with that– I was really into Lookout! Records and pop-punk stuff, and somehow that lead me to riot grrl chat rooms on AOL. I met a lot of people that way– some of whom are still my best friends. I was hugely influenced by Team Dresch, The Third Sex, Helium, Bikini Kill, Excuse 17… but at the same time I was also listening to like, Steely Dan. So I can’t pretend that I was ever really that cool.

What do you want people to remember about your band in the years to come?

RebaWe all met as volunteers for Girls Rock Campaign Boston, which –I think it’s safe to say– has inspired all of us to play music. Personally, I had a few years where I stopped playing music… for stupid insecurity reasons. Playing music with Slamber, Ashley, and Kathleen has allowed me to relax a little bit and just have fun. For once I’m not thinking about how I look on stage, or if the audience is dancing or not, or if the audience even exists in the first place. It’s just fun. I hope that people pick up on that and are inspired to start a band of their own, the way that GRCB bands have inspired us.

Why did you join a band and what instruments do you play?

RebaAfter a session of Ladies Rock Camp (a GRCB fund-raiser) had ended, I found myself inspired but also kind of restless. I saw a lot of talent and was given this new energy during Camp, and I wanted to keep it going. So we (our original drummer: Tanya Palit, Ashley, Kathleen, and I) just got together and played some cover songs one evening. We didn’t have any expectations other than to challenge ourselves and maybe build some new friendships. Tanya (<3) had to step away from drums to focus on some other projects, so Slamber joined us just after our first show.

We rotate vocals and instruments in the band. Ashley, Slamber, and I move between guitar/bass/drums– for selfish reasons… so we don’t get bored. Kathleen keeps anchor on keys because she is better at it than any of us. I’ve learned a ton from watching Slamber play drums and guitar. And Ashley is always encouraging us to move around and loosen up on stage. Kathleen has pipes like woah. It’s great to be able to try new things and learn from each other.

female members we should know about?

RebaI’m hesitant to pigeon hole anyone if they don’t feel comfortable with the label. I guess I’d just encourage people to support women in music in general… or just support women in general… and we’ll all benefit from it either way.

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Cuisine en Locale on Highland Ave in Somerville.

Meet: Band Without Hands

Band Without Hands was a plan hatched in Vacationland… which quickly grew from Brien Sweet and Jess Jacobs working with samples and drum machines to a rock monster additionally fueled by Nick Martinelle’s double kicking feet and John McKusick’s guitar wizardry. Brien and Jess have written and performed together off and on for more than a decade, with this recent project being a much needed outlet for strong emotions and responses to our very complicated world. At once political and emotionally vulnerable, the hard rock fabric is interwoven with elements of new wave, industrial, and trip hop, creating a unique sound that blows doors off venues and minds out of skulls. With members influenced by pretty much every genre under the sun, Band Without Hands draws from a vast palette to create cohesive, intriguing, adrenaline-fueled social and emotional commentary. BWH is independent in the sense that they self-record, self-produce, and self-promote, and work damn hard at it. The band loves playing live, loves supporting our brothers and sisters in our beloved music scene, and loves connecting with area musicians and music lovers alike! (Bio Courtesy of the band)

QWIMB asked band member Jess Jacobs to answer some questions for us, and here is what she said:

What brought you to Boston? 

Most of us grew up in the area; Jess and Brien grew up in Merrimack NH, John in Pepperell MA, and Nick on Long Island. It was a natural migration from Southern NH for us art and music (and queer culture!) seekers.

Have you experienced a strong scene for queer women in the city in terms of music/performers etc?

I have met many queer lady performers, but I haven’t yet experienced a solidly organized community in that sense – we perform frequently with Unstraight, an all-queer band, (catch us both June 6th at Copperfield’s for a seriously awesome pride kickoff party) but I would love to start or contribute to a more formal organization of us queer entertainers.

Photo by Lindsey Boyer
Photo by Lindsey Boyer

Do you have any sense of a history of a queer scene here or is the past a faded memory?

It seems to me that there were a lot of scenes here that somehow have dried up after years of corporate takeover and rising property values. Everybody suffers when the art/music scene is starved out of existence, but I think it impacts the queer community heavily because they are typically very intertwined. I also think that the queer community suffers the same plight. I remember going to places like ManRay when I was younger and it was such a great place for everyone to have, and nothing has really come along to replace it. I’m sad to see local venues disappear or get absorbed by national interests, and I’m sad to see places being forced out of business by circumstance and lack of revenue; I guess it’s hard to compete with Netflix. But the people that ARE out seeing shows, buying merch, playing indie bands on their radio shows and car stereos, spreading the word about great art and music, all of us together are building this really vibrant and friendly community and it’s very exciting.

What made you decide to join a band?

I never decided to join a band, per se. I’ve been playing and writing music for more than two decades, so it’s always been a part of my life. This particular band, I came back from living far away for a number of years and really wanted to take the reigns and all of my experience with the industry and see what the hell I could make happen. Brien and I happened to grab a beer very soon after I was back in town and he wanted to do the same thing, so we teamed up.

Are there any artists that you look up to or who have inspired your own music?

Absolutely! I personally really look up to bold artists who aren’t afraid to challenge the norm in terms of musical style or message. Trent Reznor, Zack de la Rocha, Tori Amos, PJ Harvey, Bjork, Karen O. I grew up listening to lots of new wave and electronica, along with 90s rock, Alice in Chains, Smashing Pumpkins, that kind of thing. There’s also a huge chunk of ambient, like Boards of Canada, and classical music, primarily modern classical, from playing in concert bands and orchestras. It’s a widely varied pastiche, for sure. Tegan and Sara are a recent acquisition in my catalog (amazingly, I know, where have I been), and I really look up to them as queer performers and songwriters.

photo by Lindsey Boyer
photo by Lindsey Boyer

Do think things are getting better for queer female performers or are there still barriers to overcome?

I definitely think things have gotten better, and are getting better, but there will always be certain types of harassment – and that’s true regardless of sexual preference. I’ve played shows and been followed around by the – to put it nicely – very typical dude who won’t respect your sexuality for hours, and it gets to a point where you feel unsafe sometimes, so we all have to stick together. I started carrying a pocket knife, for what it’s worth.

Are you in any other bands?

I am not in any other bands at this time; however, I’m working with Unstraight on their upcoming release, doing production and mixing work.

What has been your proudest moment as a member of a band?

I honestly continue to experience my proudest moment every time we step on stage. We put in a lot of effort and the payoff is huge, when I see the audience having a great time – that’s the most proud I’ll ever be, always. It’s not a one sided satisfaction, like “oh, i’m playing my songs on stage” – we’re there to facilitate a great time and hopefully connect with people, remind everyone of the all too oft forgotten universal bonds that hold us all together like loving arms. And maybe, just maybe, inspire questioning of authority and culture.

photo by Lindsey Boyer
photo by Lindsey Boyer

 What advice would you give to a woman thinking about starting a band or  learning an instrument?

Cliche, but don’t be afraid what anyone else thinks, especially not in the beginning, whether of an instrument or of a band. Find your bond with an instrument – find that texture that just draws you in, soothes you. The love you pour into an instrument – or band – like that, it feeds that bond. Then when you go to step on stage, you won’t be terrified and nervous, because you know you can rely on your instrument and/or your band.

 Are there any other current or former bands you would like to see featured by QWIMB?

Unstraight and Petty Morals come to mind!

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Want to hear the band Play Live?

upcoming shows: (2014)

5/24 Opening round of FSA Rompetition at Dover Brick House, Dover NH

6/1 Midway Cafe (matinee show)

6/6 Copperfield’s with Unstraight and Mad Femme Pride – Pride kickoff!

Check them out online:

Get their album here:

bandwithouthands.bandcamp.com

Want another interview?:

recent interview with Vanyaland: http://www.vanyaland.com/2014/04/28/interview-band-without-hands-bands-without-hands-music-make-video-games/

FUR PURSE!!

FUR PURSE HAS ARRIVED

So just who or what is a Fur Purse?

Fur Purse is:

  • Eve Belfer-Ahern – vocals, saxaphone, keyboards
  • Amy Tyson – guitar
  • Claire Passey – drums

Bio from Facebook: “Menacing, pubesenct, black hearts.”

QWIMB asked the Fur Purse women some questions about life, love, and the pursuit of fur purses and here is what they had to say:

What brought you to Boston and how long have you lived here?

Eve, Claire and Amy were all summoned to planet Earth at different times, but for the same reason:  to be in Fur Purse.  Eve arrived in Boston first, having appeared to have been born and bred here.  Amy showed up in Boston not long after Eve first appeared, and did a bunch of stuff while biding her time.  Claire is the one who is still the most jet lagged.

Why did you form Fur Purse, what brought you all together?

Destiny cannot be denied, everybody knows this!    Inexorable forces, that’s what.  What more can we tell you?  Do you really expect us to understand these forces?  That is similar to us asking, “Why are you, Tina, so deadpanning-ly funny?”

Do you think there’s a good scene/community in Boston for queer female musicians?

We think it is amazing!!  You go queer female musicians!!!

No seriously, even though we don’t believe in labeling ourselves, we know, enjoy, are amazed  and are grateful for the INCREDIBLY strong female presence in Boston Indie Rock!!!  It gives us strength and courage!

Why do you think it was ordained 1000’s of years ago that the three of us would end up at these very particular coordinates as Fur Purse?  If you don’t believe what we are saying is true, then you probably think Ladies Rock Camp is a hoax too.

Fur Purse has Peeps
Fur Purse has Peeps

Have you noticed any trends in the scene, i.e. is it better or worse now than it used to be?

Based on the analysis of the data we each have been transmitting continuously  from the BostonMA area back to our source originations, there has a steep increase in people of the non-male persuasion playing instruments, singing and thrusting their pelvises on-stage in clubs and halls around town.  Marked increase.  Preliminary analysis points to probable cause/influence as likely being an organization, a camp, if you will, that is for ladies who want to rock.

eve yelling claire drums
Eve and Claire at The Cantab

Are there any artists who have inspired you musically or personally?

Amy: Cindy Wonderfulis someone who really helped light the way for me on this crazy zoom zoom wheee!   Eve sends props to all the great performers, like David Bowie, or Boston’s own Deb Nicholson.  Claire says The Haggard broke all the rules and changed her dna forever.

Have you been in other bands before Fur Purse?

Do you BFP?  What is BFP?  This is an illogical concept.

When and how did you get started playing music?

Amy started on air guitar first, then switched to a material, physical guitar at some point, because it’s louder and therefore sounds better.  Claire first started on the sewing machine at her mother’s behest. Once she mastered that sewing machine, her mother said she had “earned the right to hit things really hard”.  Eve started singing in her dreams, and continues to this day.  Shhhh don’t wake her up.

Claire and Amy at the Milky Way
Claire and Amy at the Milky Way

How did you come up with the name Fur Purse : ) ?

Goddammit!  It is not what you and some other people think!!  How can we ever get that through to you people!  We are going to keep protesting this until you believe us!

No – “Fur Purse” is really just a term for a sort of small-ish container into which people put things, in order to carry them around.   Like if you were a trader in the 1850’s on the Oregon Trail you would likely have a fur purse. or maybe if you were a fancy lady in out on the town in the present day. OK?

…I think that’s it. Again, if there’s a question you’d really like to answer feel free to add it on.

Yeah here are some questions I think we should answer:

What is best thing about being in band?   #1 Groupies  #2 Feelings

What is worst thing about being in band?   Feelings

What advice would you give to people who want to start a band?  Just do it and don’t look back!

Claire and Eve at The Milkyway
Claire and Eve at The Milkyway

For More on Fur Purse, visit their Facebook page.

An Introduction to Anjimile

 thanksgiving-2012Meet local artist and student, Anjimile!

Juxtaposing the subtle warmth of an acoustic guitar and harmonious vocals with biting, sardonic lyrics, Anjimile is a musical force to be reckoned with. She grew up in Richardson, TX but moved to the bustling city of Boston in hopes of becoming a part of its thriving music scene and escaping the pervasive homophobia of the south. Anjimile’s first full-length LP, In the Garden, was produced by Eric Santagada, professional bassist and recent Northeastern graduate, in Santagada Studios. A labour of love, In the Garden touches on the universal themes of lust, loss, love and learning how to grow up. Some of her influences include indie-rock band Born Ruffians, The Jackson 5, Freddie Mercury, Sufjan Stevens, Say Anything and Violent Femmes. She currently attends Northeasern University, her favorite author is William Faulkner and she is Kanye West’s biggest fan.

Something of a tongue twister, Anjimile’s name comes from a little-known language called Chichewa which is spoken in the east-African country of Malawi, where both of her parents were born and raised. The name ‘Anjimile’ means ‘denied a boy’, as her parents desired a son after giving birth to two girls already. Ironically, Anjimile is a full-blown lesbian. (Bio courtesy of artist)

Anjimile Singin'
Anjimile Singin’

QWIMB asked Anjimile to answer the standard questions we love to ask about her views on various aspects of queerness in Boston. She was gracious enough to provide us with the following responses:

Did you grow up in the Boston area? (if so where, if not, why come here?)

No. I was born in West Virginia,  then my family moved to Iowa (where my brother was born), and a few years after that we settled in Richardson, Texas. So I’ve lived the majority of my life in Texas, from about age 4 or 5 to 18.
Baby Anjimile
Baby Anjimile

Do you think there is a strong community of queer women here either performing or supporting a music scene?

I’m just getting into the Boston music scene so I’m not I have enough experience to say, but I suppose from what I’ve seen I’d say not particularly. Then again, maybe I just don’t know where to look.

Are there any artists/performers who have been particularly influential to you?

I’m a big Michael Jackson fan. When I was a kid my parents would blast the Jackson 5 and I grew up imitating the way baby-Michael sang. I also love Freddie Mercury and Stevie Wonder. I’d say my biggest influences by far have been Sufjan Stevens and Born Ruffians. The Born Ruffians kind of catapulted me into the wide, wonderful world of indie rock and Sufjan Stevens is straight-up amazing. Vocally and lyrically he’s just the best.

What has been your experience with the various in venues for music in Boston? Have you played many of them? What was the crowd like?

Boloco Jammin
Boloco Jammin

I’ve had pretty limited experience playing venues in Boston. I like to tell myself it’s because I’m extremely busy with school and don’t have a lot of time to spend trying to book shows, but honestly I know I need to get out there and play. Mostly I frequent the Boloco on Boylston and Mass Ave. They have Open Mics on Wednesdays and performances on Thursday where they have a featured artist a lot. When I have the time I get myself signed up as the featured artist. It’s pretty awesome. The crowd is chill and they pay you with free food.

Why did you get into playing/performing music? Is there anything specific you would like listeners to hear when they connect with your music?

 I’ve been surrounded by good music since I was born. My parents would play the greats: Bob Marley, Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson. I grew up in a very musical household. My two older sisters are also great singers and my little brother plays the drums, bass and guitar. I’ve always been surrounded by music and I learned to love it. Now it’s everything I am. My music is a representation of who I am as a person. Generally, I have an extremely difficult time expressing my emotions. Music, I have found, allows me to express myself exactly how I need to. I want listeners to hear the melodies and the harmonies but I also want them to listen closely to the lyrics. I don’t hold anything back when I write and my music is as honest as I get. When I sing I sing with emotion, and I want listeners to feel the music like I feel it. Performing is a really cathartic experience for me.

 

"Groovin"
“Groovin”

Wanna Hear Some More From Anjimile?

Meet Gaetana Brown of Little War Twins

Gaetana Brown is a member of the Boston- based band Little War Twins. She answered some questions for us about queerness, music and Boston: our favorite things.

Q&A:

Did you grow up in the Boston area? (if so where, if not, why come here?)

I grew up in a 3 by 3 mile town called Ayer in Massachusetts. I came  to Boston to change my life and throw myself into my dream of becoming a musician.

Do you think there is a strong community of queer women here either performing or supporting a music scene?

Oh yeah! Amazing bands like Brief Awakening, Trauma Queens and solo  performers like Danielle Lessard and Kristen Ford really helped me grow  as an artist and come out. Also with radio shows like Three Strange  Women on unregularradio.com with Jackie Soriano, I feel that Boston has a supportive group of women who are out and about!

Are there any artists/performers who have been particularly influential to you?

I think my most influential artist this year was Tune-yards. She is a one woman powerhouse weaving innovation with no mercy. I am in love  with her music and warrior spirit.

What has been your experience with the various in venues for  music in Boston? Have you played many of them? What was the crowd like?

I feel like I have played at almost every club in this city and the crowd is forever changing. There are some shows where people stay  for every set, some where people leave when their friends set is done,  but it’s never quite the same. I see local musicians really supporting  eachother in Boston, I find that truly inspirational.

Why did you get into playing/performing  music? Is there anything specific you would like listeners to hear when  they connect with your music?

 I got into playing and performing music because I love poetry. When I  was ten years old I fell in love with words and began writing. After  finding the guitar I thought, music is my poetry. I could freely express myself musically and write.

When it comes to a listener connecting to my music, I hope they can  find their own meaning. To me, art is a matter of perspective.

Now, meet Little War Twins:

Little War Twins
Little War Twins

According to their bio on the Little War Twins website:

We are strength. We are One. We are whole.

Together Little War Twins stands as a tribe, with each member threading together a tapestry of sounds that is as unique as the instrument they sheath.

  • Gaetana Brown: The Voice of the Storm (voice, rhythm guitar)
  • Patrick McConnell: The Bison-Headed-Warbird (drums)
  • Mark Pare: The Magick-Eater (lead guitar)

The words: Shock, Honesty, Freedom, Anticipation and Tempestous Reflection have all been used to describe Little War Twins live performance. In the last year, the band has already seen 3 residencies in Boston and continues to tour regionally across the North East.

Little War Twins is currently played on WNPR 90.5, UnRegularRadio.com and has been featured live on CityWide Blackout, The Boston Local Music Show, and Three Strange Women, in addition to being featured on NECN News Television.

LWT is currently recording their debut album to be released in the Fall of 2012.

HELP OUT THE BAND

“We are rock and roll  mystics and we are about to hit the road for six months. Right now we  have an indiegogo campaign to raise money for our tour van, where we  will eat, sleep and basically live. We are so grateful to go across the country spreading love and our message, our hope is that we can do it in a reasonably safe van!”
www.indiegogo.com/littlewartwins

For More on Little War Twins

Marissa Owens: Scruffy Folk Player/Former Bostonian

Marissa Owens, a self-described “scruffy folk” musician got her start in Boston and, as she moves into new aspects of career, keeps Boston close to her heart.

Listen to One of her Songs:

See, Saw – Marissa Owens

A Brief Bio of Marissa:

“A self-taught, unsigned folk singer-songwriter,Marissa Owens finds her home in Portland, Maine. Currently enrolled at SUNYPurchase for studio composition, she is a barefoot traveling soul, paddingalong the riverbanks of love, hope, sadness, and longing. The deep meaning shefinds in place, and her cherishing of fleeting human interaction, pours throughher rhythmic, powerful, heartbeat-esque finger picking style. Withdiary-confession lyricism, her music exudes a feeling of being suspendedbetween wandering and searching— both lost and found, home and away.”

QWIMB asked Marissa to answer some of our favorite questions about Boston and queerness, as we like to do. Here are her responses.

What brought you to Boston?

I came to Boston to study at Boston University. I was pursuing a degree in human physiology, but instead of studying, I wrote songs and recorded them in my dorm room. Boston was the place where songwriting started for me. Unfortunately for my roommate, I was always practicing tunes. Eventually, I had to pay attention to the fact that I dreaded school and should not be wasting money or time in the wrong place. I withdrew from Boston University and decided to apply to SUNY Purchase’s studio composition program. I had a free year between studying at Boston and SUNY Purchase, and in that time I got to reflect on my experiences in Boston.

What was your experience like in Boston?

While I was in Boston, I met a lot of great people because of my involvement in the queer scene at Boston University. I made a point to go to events outside of Boston University, just to feel more comfortable in the community. Boston allowed me to be open about my queerness as an adult. That was so valuable to me.

I loved wandering around Boston. I liked getting lost in the crowd, and I spent a lot of my time riding the T alone just to think. On my campus, people didn’t smile at others walking by. I wasn’t used to that. On one hand, I wanted strangers to connect, but on the other hand, I liked passing through a crowd where nobody cared about me. It is a confusing way for me to feel, but I explored all of that confusion and angst in my songs.

What’s great about Boston is there are so many young people there. There’s a feel of excitement, inspiration, and open-mindedness.

Did you feel there was a “scene” for queer female musicians? What about queer women of color? Is there a strong Boston scene in that regard? Was it welcoming/unwelcoming?:

There is a scene for female musicians. Although I was not playing shows in Boston, all of the artists I met and respected in Boston were women. I was so lucky to meet Jenny Owen Youngs and Steph Barrak. For big names, and indie musicians alike, I think Boston has a place for all musicians, because of the range of venues available. I was really in tune with the queer musician scene, and I think Boston supports that scene as well. What’s important is for people to create the scene, and a lot of musicians are doing that, with house shows and such, and that is incredible. As far as a scene for queer women of color, I didn’t really experience that. That isn’t to say that it doesn’t exist, but I’m sure the scene could be much stronger. Every place could stand to be more welcoming toward queer women of color who are musicians. Every place could be more welcoming to women in general. For a woman to get up and relate what she really thinks and feels is still shamed by society. That’s the way it is for people who are queer, of color, etc. But, we ignore all of that, and keep putting ourselves out there.

Thanks Marissa for answering our questions and adding to the QWIMB community!

For more info on Marissa and her music here are some links: